China Matters

China Matters documents the Down-to-earth Smart Life in Tianjin

Share

(Beijing): From having sports to mobile payment to seeing a doctor online, we have been overwhelmed by a one-screen-and-one-click lifestyle.

But what if they have turned smart altogether?

In Tianjin Binhai New Area, a subordinate city in the town has been trying to make everything intelligent living here.

Obtaining sports data from a smart runaway, charging mobile phones from a solar bench, or seeing a doctor through smart devices---they are not just too good to be true but more of a down-to-earth life experience.

As a joint project of the two countries, China Singapore Tianjin Eco-City aims at bringing an environment-friendly and resource-saving life to its inhabitants.

In this 8-minute video, British resident Josh showcases one day of his “smart life” in the Eco-City located 150 kilometers from Beijing.

In the morning, he could run in a smart track that is equipped with facial recognition technology and multiple sensors. They can capture his heart pulse as well as his gender and age, and give him a customized result of his running performance.

After having sports, Josh would take an electric self-driving bus to go around the city. These buses recognize traffic lights and emergency on the road, then they react immediately. In the afternoon, he usually reads at the China-Singapore Friendship Library, where robots help him look for books and get books returned.

How smart is an eco-city?

Contacts

Li Siwei
Tel:008610-68996566
E-mail:lisiwei5125@gmail.com

About China Matters

China Matters
China Matters



Subscribe to releases from China Matters

Subscribe to all the latest releases from China Matters by registering your e-mail address below. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Latest releases from China Matters

China Matters Documents New Tourism in Rural China7.12.2020 16:44:23 CETPress release

(Beijing): Unlike typical household supplies featuring wooden furniture and adobe stove in Chinese villages in the past, Xiaowupu, or “little five villages” in northern China’s Tianjin brings in Ikea style to its hostels to attract tourists. This rural area consisting of five villages is located in Beichen district and selected for a modern tourism project in the port city. In these villages, modern hostels featuring Ikea-style furniture and decorations have been built to accommodate tourists, especially young and foreign guests. Besides, the villages offer fruits picking, home cooking, family cinemas, game rooms and even VR entertainment devices for tourists. The local government is determined to make rural tourism an experience beyond just rural lifestyle. Contrary to today’s much tidy and well-ordered landscape, the area was fairly different dozens of years ago. The roads were muddy and bumpy, and villagers were not able to use family washrooms. In this video, Sweden host Miriam too

China Matters documents the Ecological Turn of China’s Infertile Coast2.12.2020 12:19:02 CETPress release

(Beijing): Along China’s northeastern coast of Bohai Sea stretched a strip of saline-alkali soil back in 1980s. It could barely afford any arable fields for plants and crops. In 1994, Binhai New Area of Tianjin was established by the coast as a greening and eco-restoration project just rolled out in the region. After over 20 years’ efforts, a 736-square-kilometer Green Ecological Barrier has been built up between Binhai New Area and downtown Tianjin, which represents the ecological overhaul of the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region. In this video, American host Jack takes a trip to the Binhai New Area of Tianjin, exploring the locale, talking with the greening workers and getting to know what changes the area went through. During the journey, Jack rode a bike from the congested downtown to the Beidagang Wetland Nature Preserve in suburban Tianjin. There, he worked withforest rangers and fed birds corn and fish. “Tianjin people's ability to turn a wasteland into a forest and to restore these

China Matters documents story of Ren Xiaoyuan: Solving the water problems in rural China17.11.2020 08:59:07 CETPress release

(Beijing): Despite China’s continued development, few solutions have been found to tackle the water quality issues that are prevalent in many rural areas. Ren Xiaoyuan is the head of MyH2O, a non-profit organization that is working to bring clean water to the people of rural China. The documentary filmed her most recent project which involves installing a water purification station in a village in Hebei province. “I knew I was unable to solve the problem by myself, but I could raise awareness, so that others could.” Ren explained her original goal in the documentary. Ren has a dual MS degree in Environmental Engineering & Technology and Policy from MIT, and she started MyH2O in 2015. At very beginning, she just wanted to lead teams to carry out research and collecting localized data about water problems in rural areas to create a map, which could help to make unheard voices heard. However, when their team interviewed local villagers, they were always asked the same question. “When our